As part of the NISO Plus scholarship application process, we ask applicants to tell us which standard they would be, and why. It’s an optional — and fun! — question, and reading their answers is always one of the high points of the review process. We are happy to share the responses from this year’s cohort with you, in alphabetical order.

Elham Abdallah (Assistant University Librarian for Public Services and Research, Holy Spirit University of Kaslik, Lebanon): ​​I would be ANSI/NISO Z39.18-2005 (R2010) Scientific and Technical Reports – Preparation, Presentation, and Preservation Standard to enhance my reports and presentations skills since I’m involved in the visibility and outreach of my community.

Bethany Arsenault (Digital Discovery Librarian, Edmonton Public Library, Canada): If I were an information standard, I would be ANSI/NISO Z39.7-2013 Information Services and Use: Metrics & Statistics for Libraries and Information Providers Data Dictionary – because of how important metrics and statistics for databases are to my role. Having standard metric definitions, even for basic library data at a national level, is of huge importance to how libraries receive funding for certain collections or aspects of the library. Being able to clearly define these metrics using set standards is extremely important.

Cindy Gruwell (Assistant Librarian/Coordinator of Scholarly Research, University of West Florida, USA): ​​I would be ANSI/NISO Z39.29-2005 (R2010) Bibliographic References. These references and ultimately citations serve as the backbone for finding all documented information. At times information can be very difficult to find, however when adhering to the relevant standards information has the opportunity to shared and accessed globally.

Suzanne Heslan (Librarian, Manx National Heritage, Isle of Man, UK): There is nothing ‘standard’ about me, due to my disabilities. However, from a neurotypical and professional perspective, I would be ANSI/NISO Z39.86-2005 (R2012) Specifications for the Digital Talking Book. This is because speaking books have helped me so much to overcome my disabilities, due to my relatively slow processing speed when reading.

Yuimi Hlasten (E-resources and Scholarly Communication Librarian, Denison University, USA): ANSI/NISO Z39.7-2013 Information Services and Use: Metrics & Statistics for Libraries and Information Providers Data Dictionary, because I love math, and I take care of Counter data in my current job.

Benjamin Ignac (Policy Analyst, Taylor & Francis, Germany): ANSI/NISO Z39.18-2005 (R2010, Scientific and Technical Reports – Preparation, Presentation, and Preservation) Why? Because I like scientific and technical reports and I believe it is important to format them properly to make processes of scientific communication and knowledge transfer with the readers more efficient.

Lorin Jackson (Executive Director, NNLM Region 2, Medical University of South Carolina, USA): ANSI/NISO Z39.2-1994 (R2016) Information Interchange Format: I appreciate and respect different types of media. I enjoy the way they interact with one another and influence one another.

Kasia Repeta (Analyst, Global Outreach and Publishing Systems, Duke University Press, USA): If I was an information standard, I would be Persistence. I recognize the importance of using persistence identifier links in my work as a key component of the digital information infrastructure. Furthermore, a high level of personal persistence has helped me to endure and overcome substantial challenges over the past few years, both privately and professionally.

 

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